Events

Join us for Research Issues, a weekly conversation about writing, presentations, and graduate studies, as well as presentations by educational scholars. Faculty and graduate students welcome.

12:30 - 2:00 PM each Tuesday

633 Education South

2018-2019

2017-2018

Summer Institute Lectures for 2018

Tuesday July 3 2018, 3:00 to 4:30 pm in Room ED N2-115. Reva Joshee, Simone Shirvell, Monica Thomas, Kristi Mahood, Arief Ibrahim, Regan Hold, Dorianne Martyniuk and Jessica Sereda entitled SLOW PEACE AND THE LONG MARCH. Please see the attached for more information: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GQFyQkt7wjz7xJx6RZLZJeCcRpeeieWd/view?u...

Thursday July 5 2018, 3:00 to 4:30 pm in Room ED N2-115. The Right Reverend Dr. Jane Alexander, Bishop of Edmonton entitled POVERTY AND HUMAN RIGHTS: ENDING THE BLAME GAME. Please see the attached for more information:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Q9FMQHNnEZsns67Wb241FsHEjbUBAI3h/view?u..

Tuesday July 10 2018, 3:00 to 4:30 pm in Room ED N2-115 by Dan Scratch. Please see the attached for more information.

2017-2018


Dr. Yi Li, Associate Professor of Second Language Education, Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba will present at the CRTED on June 19, 2018 from 12:30 to 2:00 pm. The title of her presentation will be "Silent or Silenced Period: A Narraative Inquiry into One Emergent Bilingual Child's Transition from Home to Preschool". Please see the attached for more information: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1BSG09aup1ZMM9hD0X5XqYrH29TVr6QNW

 

As Winner of the 2018 Dr. Mary Young Memorial Travel Fund, Remonia Stoddart-Morrison made a presentation on her research: "Storying the Evaluation of Teacher Competencies in Jamaica" on Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018 in Room 633 Education South between 12:30 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. Please see the attached for more information: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ExG7UmGnlJyj2rqROvALxjtZZXpUmrHk


 

Dr. Simmee Chung, winner of the 2017 Faculty of Education Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award shared a presentation on her dissertation on April 24, 2018, 4:00 - 5:30 PM in Room 122 Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series and was entitled "A Narrative Inquiry into Aboriginal Youth and Families' Experiences of Belonging as Interwoven with Identity Making."  Please see the attached for further details of her presentation: https://drive.google.com/open?id=19qaQF_TNVzbOmakwm0r76ANPS85WCgQD

Please see the video of this presentation: 


 Dr. Lynn Butler-Kisber, from McGill University in Montreal presented "An Arts-based Research Journey" on Tuesday, March 20, 2018 at 12:30 to 2:30 pm in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series.

"Arts-based research was—and is—an effort to utilize the forms of thinking and forms of representation that the arts provide as a means through which the world can be better understood and through such understanding comes the enlargement of mind" (Barone & Eisner, 2012, p. xi). This seminar focussed on an arts-based research journey which has taken place over the past several decades. It shared, the examples from personal and graduate student experiences, the milestones and challenges which emerged along the way and suggest avenues for future work. It provided spaces for audience participation and questions. Please see the attached video: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1BH07AQO7d68LVm6eDNivRyukYiHyYEZN


Dr. Young-Suk Hong from Jungwon University in Korea presented, "Teacher Stories to Live by of a Korean-American NEST Teaching at a Korean University" on Thursday, March 1, 2018 at 12:30 to 2:30 pm in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series.

Korean society is passing through a tunnel of "frenzy" in learning English. All of universities open English conversation courses to all students as the required. Thus they employ English native speakers from English speaking countries all over the world such as the US, Canada, England, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa for English education in their school. This seminar talked about how a Korean-American NEST (Native English-Speaking Teacher) composes her stories to live by in the context of Korean university in which 'nativeness' and 'whiteness' of English teachers are valued. Please see the attached video:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GM3zeygu_JCOkYiU5cYRD7gKD_MPY-9r/view?usp=sharing


 

Special Research Issues at the Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development

There was a special gathering of the research issues table on Tuesday April 24 2018 from 12:30 pm to 2:00 pm. Previous recipients of the Outstanding Dissertation Award were invited back to the Table and they had the opportunity to reflect on their doctoral research and to focus on issues they faced when completing their dissertations. Former award winners joined Dr. Myer Horowitz on the panel. They were Dr. Claire Desrochers, Dr. Marilyn Huber, Dr. Sonia Houle and Dr. Sean Lessard.

Dr. Lynn Butler-Kisber 

Dr. Lynn Butler-Kisber presented at the CRTED (Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development) 633 Education South on March 20 2018 at 12:30-2:00 pm. Please see the attached for more information: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1hJaxMSQhO51urO7_sudwWJMFintsNKL_

Dr. Young-Suk Hong

Dr. Young-Suk Hong presented at the CRTED (Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development) 633 Education South on March 1 2018 at 10:00-11:30 am. Please see the attached for more information: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ezhi6qFVSMobYekQlblrup3uWVYzGhZa

Special Research Issues at the Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development

There was a special gathering of the research issues table with a focus on Narrative Inquiry on Friday, March 16, 2018 from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm. New and old friends were welcomed including Lynn Butler-Kisber at our table. Many joined with their writing, research wonders and puzzles.

Presentation by Dr. Brigitte Smit

Dr. Brigitte Smit from the University of South Africa presented, "A relational perspective of rural school leadership in South Africa" on Friday, November 3, 2017 at 10:00 am to 11:30 am in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED), the Centre for Research in Applied Measurement and Evaluation (CRAME), and International Institute for Qualitative Methodology (IIQM).

 

 

 

2016-2017

Horowitz Teacher Education Research Scholar

On August 1st, Dr. Emma Quiles Fernandez, from the University of Barcelona, will take up the 2016 Horowitz Teacher Education Research Scholar position. In Fall 2016, Emma will begin a fall and winter term seminar series on care and caring.

Seminar Series: Experiences of Care and Curriculum-making

Starting on September 22, this reading group will unfold in a seminar format and is intended to engage participants in an exploration of care, caring and curriculum making, with particular emphasis on the educational relationship, a relationship expressed through sensitivity, love, touch, gesture, listening, and pedagogical tone.

To see the brochure with more information, click here.

The purpose of the seminar is to rethink, share, and discuss questions we discover as we bring our experiences alongside the readings. We will think together, think out loud, and think in community. We will engage in all of this as an educational and transformative practice that allows us to create a relationship between our educational practices with children in schools and with students in University classrooms.

2016-2017

Horowitz Teacher Education Research Scholar

On August 1st, Dr. Emma Quiles Fernandez, from the University of Barcelona, will take up the 2016 Horowitz Teacher Education Research Scholar position. In Fall 2016, Emma will begin a fall and winter term seminar series on care and caring.

Seminar Series: Experiences of Care and Curriculum-making

Starting on September 22, this reading group will unfold in a seminar format and is intended to engage participants in an exploration of care, caring and curriculum making, with particular emphasis on the educational relationship, a relationship expressed through sensitivity, love, touch, gesture, listening, and pedagogical tone.

To see the brochure with more information, click here.

The purpose of the seminar is to rethink, share, and discuss questions we discover as we bring our experiences alongside the readings. We will think together, think out loud, and think in community. We will engage in all of this as an educational and transformative practice that allows us to create a relationship between our educational practices with children in schools and with students in University classrooms.

 

Facilitator

Dr. Emma Quiles-Fernández, the 2016 Horowitz Teacher Education Research Scholar, will facilitate the reading group. For more information, please contact Emma by email at eqf@ualberta.ca or by phone.

Reconsidering Teacher Education Seminar Series

Attending to Voices and Bodies in Teacher Education: A Way of Living and Being Alongside Students

Presented by Dr. Emma Quiles-Fernández

October 12, 2017

12:00 to 1:30 pm

633 Education South

Teaching is a profession whose center is the relationship with the other, with others and with ourselves. This means that we need to feel ourselves in connection with our lives, stories, bodies and voices, remaining connected to our experience as a way to return to it recursively.

For more information, check out the event poster.

Welcome to Dr. Sumer Seiki

From October 17 - 28, Dr. Sumer Seiki, from the Teacher Education Department at the University of San Francisco, will be at the CRTED as a visiting scholar. On October 26, 12-1.30 pm, Dr. Seiki will give the 2nd Reconsidering Teacher Education Seminar: Personal Identity Shifts Impact Teacher Education Elementary Science Methods Curriculum.

Click here for the brochure with more information.

Welcome to Dr. Cindy Clarke

The CRTED is excited that Dr. Cindy Clarke, President, Prairie Spirit Teachers' Association and who recently defended her doctoral dissertation: " Beyond the muskeg: Poetic representations of a narrative inquiry into curriculum making and identity making on the edges of community" (University of Saskatchewan), will be visiting November 15-17th.

Seminar: Experiences of Care and Curriculum-making

You are invited to attend the March seminar for the Experiences of care and curriculum making: Senses of the educational relationship seminar series. This seminar is intended to engage participants in an exploration of care, caring, and curriculum making, with particular emphasis on the educational relationship, a relationship expressed through sensitivity, love, touch, gesture, listening, and pedagogical tone. It is facilitated by Dr. Emma Quiles-Fernandez, the Horowitz Teacher Education Research Scholar. The conversations are shaped around readings which are available by contacting Emma at eqf@ualberta.ca This month’s readings are an article by Carola Conle, about four preservice teachers and their experiential narratives; and a chapter by Ted Aoki, in which a teacher shares stories connected with the curriculum as lived experience.

Thursday, March 16, 10:00 to 11:30 am, in 633 Education South.

Tensions and Complexities in Professional Education presented by Dr. Andrew Estefan

The CRTED is pleased to announce that Dr. Andrew Estefan, who is an associate professor of psychiatric nursing at the University of Calgary, will present the third in the 2016-17 Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. Dr. Estefan will discuss the increasing emphasis on work readiness in professional practice disciplines within universities and the tensions this emphasis shapes for both students and faculty. Dr. Estefan, who leads a program of research at the intersections of mental health, human sexuality, and narrative inquiry, will consider the experiences and effects of this shift in understanding the purpose of professional education in university contexts. Graduate students and teacher educators from across the Faculty and beyond are invited to this seminar, which will take place on Monday, March 27, 2:00 to 3:30 pm, in Room 633 Education South. Please see the brochure for more information.

Reconsidering Teacher Education Seminar Series - (Un)Becoming Teacher of School-based Indigenous Education: Early Career Teachers, Teacher Identity, and Indigenous Education Across Institutions, presented by Dr. Brooke Madden

Tuesday, May 16, 2017 12:30 to 2:00 pm

Room 633, Education South

 

This presentation will explore the experiences of Indigenous and ally early career teachers who completed university coursework and/or professional development on the topic of Indigenous education.

 

Brooke Maddens' maternal ancestry is Wyandot/Iroquois, French, and German, and her paternal ancestry is Mi'kmaq, Irish, and English. She currently works as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Educational Policy Studies, Faculty of

Education, University of Alberta. Brooke's current research focuses on the relationship between teacher identity and teacher education on the topics of Aboriginal education and truth and reconciliation education.

 

Please see the brochure for further information.

New Summer Course!

Gandhian Inspired Social Action Research

July 4 to 13, 2017

Instructor: Dr. Reva Joshee

As part of the Mahatma Gandhi Summer Institute: Building Peaceful Communities, this new 3-credit graduate level course will explore the work of Mahatma Gandhi and other peace scholars and teachers alongside understandings of social action research methodology. Please see the brochure for further information.

Contact: Joanne Farmer at jfarmer@ualberta.ca

Closing Seminar: Experiences of care and curriculum making

Dr. Emma Quiles-Fernández invites everyone who has been part of the Experiences of Care and Curriculum Making seminar series community over the past school year to gather for a closing conversation about our shared experiences and the journey we have walked together. Whether you attended one seminar or all the seminars, Emma would love to have you be part of the conversation. You are also invited to watch the video “The Butterfly Circus” (https://vimeo.com/17150524), prior to the seminar, to help us think about the experience of accompanying, caring, and being alongside. For further information, please email Emma at eqf@ualberta.ca

Welcome Visiting Scholars

We are excited to have three visiting scholars in the Centre during the last week of March. Dr. Andrew Estefan, University of Calgary, will be in the Centre from March 27 to 31and will give the 3rd Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar on March 27th. Dr. Shaun Murphy, University of Saskatchewan, and Vivienne Bengezen, Federal University of Uberlandia, Brazil, will be visiting on March 27th and 28th.

Remembered with Love and Respect

The Centre community has lost a beloved friend, Joy Ruth Mickelson, who was a participant at the Centre over many, many years and whose presence and wisdom touched many, many lives. In response to the many people who have asked how to donate to the Joy Ruth Mickelson Doctoral Student Scholarship, please click here to be taken to the University of Alberta's Faculty of Education Online Donation page. Please add your donation to the box that says "An area not listed (please fill out the information below)."

2017 Dr. Mary Young Memorial Travel Fund

The Centre is pleased to announce that applications for the 2017 Dr. Mary Young Memorial Travel Fund are due March 31, 2017. For further information on how to apply please click here.

2016 Joy-Ruth Mickelson Doctoral Student Award

Congratulations to Yuanli Chen who was the recipient of this year's Joy-Ruth Mickelson Doctoral Student Award.

Welcome to Visiting Scholar, Dr. Sumer Seiki

We are excited to have Dr. Sumer Seiki, from the University of San Francisco, participating in the Centre during the week of June 12-16th.

Public Lectures - 2017 Mahatma Gandhi Summer Institute

Everyone is warmly invited to attend the three public lectures for the 2017 Mahatma Gandhi Summer Institute, on July 4, 6, and 11, from 3:00 to 4:30 pm in ED N2-115. Please click on the links below for further information about each lecture.

Tuesday, July 4: Mary Pinkoski, Spoken word poet and arts educator

Thursday, July 6: Kaia Lamothe, Director of Education for Treaty 8 First Nations of Alberta

Tuesday, July 11: Amanah Eljaji & Youth in Grade 9 at Edmonton Islamic Academy

Congratulations to Zahra Kasamali, Recipient of the 2017 Dr. Mary Young Memorial Travel Fund

Zahra Kasamali, a PhD Candidate in the University of Alberta's Department of Secondary Education, will be making a presentation based upon her doctoral research, The Curricular and Pedagogical Significance of Wisdom Traditions in Deepening Understandings of Difference, at the 2017 Canadian Society for the Study of Education conference. Zahra's work explores the curricular and pedagogical significance of Sufic and Cree wisdom traditions in deepening understandings of difference.

 

Zahra shared her presentation at the Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development on Tuesday, May 23. Please see the brochure for further information and click on the above title to access the video of Zahra's presentation.

Reconsidering Teacher Education Seminar Series - (Un)Becoming Teacher of School-based Indigenous Education: Early Career Teachers, Teacher Identity, and Indigenous Education Across Institutions, presented by Dr. Brooke Madden

Tuesday, May 16, 2017 12:30 to 2:00 pm

Room 633, Education South

 

This presentation explored the experiences of Indigenous and ally early career teachers who completed university coursework and/or professional development on the topic of Indigenous education.

 

Brooke Maddens' maternal ancestry is Wyandot/Iroquois, French, and German, and her paternal ancestry is Mi'kmaq, Irish, and English. She currently works as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Educational Policy Studies, Faculty of

Education, University of Alberta. Brooke's current research focuses on the relationship between teacher identity and teacher education on the topics of Aboriginal education and truth and reconciliation education.

 

Please click on the above title to access the transcript of Brooke's seminar.

2018 Presentations

Dr. Simmee Chung, Winner of the 2017 Faculty of Education Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award. Dr. Chung presented, “A Narrative Inquiry into Aboriginal Youth and Families’ Experiences of Belonging as Interwoven with Identity Making”, on Tuesday, April 24, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in Room 122, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the twentieth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES. Watch the presentation.


Lynn Butler-Kisber (B.Ed., M.Ed., McGill; Ed.D. Harvard) is a Professor of Education at McGill University. Her work includes qualitative methodologies; leadership, multiliteracies; and professional development. She is particularly interested in arts-based methodologies. She focuses on issues of marginalization, equity and social justice. New publications include Poetic inquiries of reflection and renewal: Poetry as research (2017), with Guiney Yallop, Stewart & Wiebe; the second edition of her book, Qualitative Inquiry: Thematic, narrative and arts-based perspectives (Sage, April 2018) and Collage-making, in the upcoming Sage encyclopedia of qualitative research (edited by Atkinson, Delacourt et al.). Dr. Butler-Kisber presented, “An Arts-based Research Journey”, on Tuesday, March 20, 2018 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the nineteenth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.“Arts-based research was—and is—an effort to utilize the forms of thinking and forms of representation that the arts provide as a means through which the world can be better understood and through such understanding comes the enlargement of mind” (Barone & Eisner, 2012, p. xi). This seminar will focus on an arts-based research journey which has taken place over the past several decades. It will share, with examples from personal and graduate student experiences, the milestones and challenges which emerged along the way and suggest avenues for future work. It will provide spaces for audience participation and questions. Watch the presentation.


Dr. Young-Suk Hong from Jungwon University in Korea presented, “Teacher Stories to Live by of a Korean-American NEST Teaching at a Korean University”, on Thursday, March 1, 2018 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the eighteenth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

Korean society is passing through a tunnel of “frenzy” in learning English. All of universities open English conversation courses to all students as the required. Thus they employ English native speakers from English speaking countries all over the world such as the US, Canada, England, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa for English education in their school. This seminar will talk about how a Korean-American NEST (Native English-Speaking Teacher) composes her stories to live by in the context of Korean university in which ‘nativeness’ and ‘whiteness’ of English teachers are valued.

2017 Presentations

Brooke Madden’s maternal ancestry is Wyandot/Iroquois, French, and German, and her paternal ancestry is Mi’kmaq, Irish, and English. She currently works as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Educational Policy Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta. Brooke’s current research focuses on the relationship between teacher identity and teacher education on the topics of Aboriginal education and truth and reconciliation education. Brooke has also published on pedagogical pathways for Indigenous education, whiteness and decolonizing, school-based Indigenous education reform, and the overlapping spaces between post-structural and decolonizing research methodologies. Dr. Madden presented, “(Un)Becoming Teacher of School-based Indigenous Education Across Institutions”, on Tuesday, May 16, 2017 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the seventeenth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES. Please click here for the transcript of Dr. Brooke Madden's Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar, presented on Tuesday, May 16, 2017.

This presentation explored the experiences of Indigenous and ally early career teachers who completed university coursework and/or professional development on the topic of Indigenous education. Teachers participated in a series of three or four individual interviews focused on how targeted teacher education, and transitions into educational work settings, shape teacher identity and practice. Analysis concentrates on four key relationships between becoming a teacher and a) pedagogical pathways for Indigenous education with/in teacher education, b) school-based sources of Indigeneity, c) significant place, and d) supports for engaging Indigenous education. The implications of tracing how significant forces direct the processes of becoming, and becoming undone as, teachers of school-based Indigenous education are highlighted for the fields of teacher education, Indigenous education, curriculum studies, and decolonizing education and research.

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Dr. Andrew Estefan is an associate professor of psychiatric nursing at the University of Calgary. He has taught in universities for 16 years in Australia, the United Kingdom, and most recently in Canada. He has served as associate dean for teaching and learning in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Calgary and leads a program of research at the intersections of mental health, human sexuality, and narrative inquiry. Dr. Estefan presented, “Tensions and Complexities in Professional Education”, on Monday, March 27, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the sixteenth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

Increasingly, universities are thought of as a place to "grow" young, workforce ready professionals. Professional practice disciplines within universities are expected to conceptualize and design curricula that prepare students to become critical thinkers and competent doers in their respective professions. The increasing emphasis on work readiness creates a tension with notions of practice readiness. That is to say, work and practice become conflated and pressure to produce competent doers increases. When practice is equated with work, both the students we "produce" as well as the faculty members who teach them are shaped in marginalizing ways. Dr. Estefan discussed the experiences and effects of this shift in understanding the purpose of professional education in university contexts.

2016 Presentations

Dr. Sumer Seiki is an Assistant Professor in the Teacher Education Department at the University of San Francisco. Her professional interests are in the areas of narrative inquiry, teacher preparation, teaching science methods, critical theory, and transformative pedagogies. Dr. Seiki presented, “Personal Identity Shifts Impact Teacher Education Elementary Science Methods Curriculum”, on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 12:00 noon to 13:30 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the fifteenth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

Using autobiographical narrative inquiry I share my journey of becoming a curricular agent for my elementary science methods course (Rosiek & Clandinin, 2015). My journey started with teaching prescribed elementary science curriculum, which ended with dissatisfied students. Compelled to change the situation I tried to integrate my funds of knowledge into science curriculum making. Integrating my multiple identities and those of my students, we co-created engaging science curriculum. This curriculum making process is good for repositioning students and teachers as well as increasing greater participation in our global health and sustainability. Join me as we learn how to take our personal funds of knowledge and translate them into science lessons.

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Dr. Emma Quiles-Fernández is interested in caring and curriculum making with particular emphasis on the educational relationship that shapes our professional experiences in schools and universities. She is a member of the research group ESFERA (Experience, Knowledge and Teacher Education. Action-Research) at the University of Barcelona (Spain), where she has taught undergraduate students in Social Education and Teacher Education. Emma has recently completed her PhD dissertation entitled “Caring for the relationship: the sense of educational experience. A narrative research”; she is currently the 2016 Horowitz Teacher Education Research Scholar in the Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development (CRTED). Dr. Quiles-Fernández presented, “Attending to Voices and Bodies in Teacher Education: A Way of Living and Being Alongside Students”, on Wednesday, October 12, 2016 at 12:00 noon to 13:30 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the fourteenth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES. Watch the presentation.

Teaching is a profession whose center is the relationship with the other, with others and with ourselves. This means that we need to feel ourselves in connection with our lives, stories, bodies and voices, remaining connected to our experience as a way to return to it recursively.

How are our bodies present in our classrooms? What social, political and cultural narratives are students embodying? How are these experiences situated in our conversations in the classroom? In what ways are teacher educators and students co-making knowledge as our lives, our experiences, meet? This seminar emerges from the puzzles Dr. Quiles-Fernández has tried to understand in her research in schools as well as through her experiences in university classrooms. By sharing stories of her experiences in both school and university classrooms, she will draw us into conversation around ways teacher education can be experienced as a sensitive and affectionate encounter with students, where unity of life is not lost.

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Dr. Florence Glanfield, Dr. Xiong Wang, Emmanuel Deogratias, Calvin Swai, Karen Jacobsenlé presented “Learning about Canadian and Alberta Education Contexts: Reflections from Participants in a Seminar Series for International Graduate Students”, on Wednesday, April 27, 2016 at 12:00 noon to 1:30 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the thirteenth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

The Department of Secondary Education organized a seminar series for international and newly immigrated graduate students. Graduate students in the departments of secondary and elementary education voluntarily participated in the seminar series. In this session you will hear of the experiences of graduate students and facilitators as they participated in the seminar activities: visiting local schools, learning of Alberta and Canadian specifics related to education, and visiting an undergraduate teacher education class. Watch the presentation.

2015 Presentations

Xiaodong Wen is the senior engineer of Thinking Training and Research Center of Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. His interests have transgressed from nonlinear physics & computer science study to humanistic education research, focusing on brain power of thinking training research and teaching. He created VETAE Thinking Tools, and developed Thinking Skill Training courses for undergraduate and graduate students at Beijing Normal University. Mr. Wen presented, “Exploration of a new method in Education—VETAE Thinking training”, on Thursday, October 1, 2015 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the twelfth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

VETAE (Values, Emotion, Thinking, Action and Evaluation) Thinking Training is a new methodology to enhance brain power to achieve educational goals. This presentation will highlight VETAE structure and provide examples to explain the usage of VETAE Thinking Tools.

Watch the presentation.

VETAE Thinking Training introduction:

http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_69b925eb0102v20q.html

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Dr. Philip McRae is an Executive Staff Officer with the Alberta Teachers’ Association and Adjunct Professor within the Faculty of Education at the University of Alberta where he earned his Ph.D. He was the Director of the Alberta Initiative for School Improvement (AISI) at the University of Alberta from 2005-2009. He taught in the Middle East (United Arab Emirates), Asia (Japan), Europe (Spain), the Lethbridge Public School District and on the Blood (Kainai) Reservation in Alberta, Canada. Speaker biography, awards, publications and reading list available at www.philmcrae.com . Dr. McRae presented, “Challenging the Promise of Personalized Learning for Teacher Education in the 21st Century”, on Tuesday, May 26, 2014 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the eleventh in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

Societies around the world are in the midst of a period of ‘transformation’ unlike any other time over the last 100 years. Phil will highlight several significant trends that will change the landscape of teaching and learning over the next two decades and specifically explore the tensions around technology and individualization, and personalized learning. This is meant to be a conversation about the ways in which our teacher education programs must both inform and (re)shape the transformation of schools for the 21st Century.

Articles of Interest: The Politics of Personalization in the 21st Century

http://bit.ly/personallearning

Rebirth of the Teaching Machine through the Seduction of Data Analytics: This Time It’s Personal http://bit.ly/philmcrae

2014 Presentations

Dr. Craig Deed is Associate Dean (Academic), Senior Lecturer in Education, and Coordinator Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary) at the School of Education, Outdoor & Environmental Studies, Faculty of Education, La Trobe University, Australia. He has published in the areas of student engagement, teacher adaptation to learning spaces, outdoor education, work with adolescents at risk, and collaborative partnerships. Dr. Deed presented, “What is Teaching? An Argument for Teacher Education to See and Act Differently”, on Thursday, November 27, 2014 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the tenth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

Emerging technological, architectural, and sociological concepts of democracy are being applied to our understanding of education. At the same time, community contexts are being inhabited by teachers and students. What does this interaction between concepts and contexts mean for existing definitions of teaching? By extension, what do new definitions and questions related to teaching mean for teacher educators? This seminar will outline recent research into preparing teachers for work in open-plan and virtual settings in low socio-economic elementary schools in Bendigo, Australia. Implications are drawn for university and school-based learning. Watch this presentation.

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Dr. Ken Zeichner is the Boeing Professor of Teacher Education, University of Washington, and professor emeritus, University of Wisconsin-Madison. His current research examines the consequences of a shift toward fast track teacher education programs in different parts of the world, the impact of recent accountability policies in teacher education around the world, and in examining a type of action research called critical practitioner inquiry as a form of professional development for teachers and teacher educators. Dr. Zeichner presented, “Teach for America and Other Lessons for Teacher Education”, on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the ninth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

Dr. Zeichner talked about the efforts to deregulate and marketize teacher education in the United States with a focus on Teach for America (TFA) and the Relay Graduate School of Education (Relay GSE). This is a good opportunity to talk about the implications of the US situation for Canadian teacher education. Watch the presentation.

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Liz Oscroft is a psychologist who, as a member of the Alberta Indian Residential School Resolution Health Support Team, has worked alongside cultural providers and community-based resolution health support providers entrusted to provide emotional, spiritual and educational support to former students, their families and communities at five National TRC hearings and many community informational and healing events. She has provided support to front line workers, many of whom are former students or are on the path of healing the intergenerational wounds of the schools.

Charlene Bearhead is an educator currently serving as the Manager of Education and Community Education for Native Counselling Services of Alberta. She provides teacher education across the country on the history and legacy of Indian Residential Schools for Project of Heart, of which she is the National Coordinator and 100 Years of Loss for the Legacy of Hope Foundation. Charlene is a member of the TRC Education Partnerships team and coordinator of Education Day for the Alberta TRC National Event.

These two people presented, “From Witness to Messenger: Educators and the Legacy of the Indian Residential Schools”, on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Room 358, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the eighth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

In anticipation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) National Alberta event taking place in Edmonton March 27-30, 2014, this seminar brings together the experiences of an educator and a therapist who have been involved in the TRC process across the country through regional and national events and are collaborating to facilitate education programming during these events. This seminar provides an overview of the TRC’s mandate and process, makes visible the intergenerational impact of residential schools and explores what we, as educators, can do to advance knowledge about Indian Residential Schools and the work of reconciliation in professional circles, research, classrooms, homes and communities.

2013 Presentations

 

Dr. Jan Gray is Director of Higher Degrees in the School of Education at Edith Cowan University. Her research over the last decade encompasses development of a strong theoretical and practical understanding of the leadership factors impacting on development of a school culture conducive to student engagement, achievement, participation and retention. Jan’s recent work with teachers and leaders in low socio-economic school communities is the basis of this presentation. Dr. Gray presented, “Improving the Educational Outcomes of Economically Disadvantaged Australian Students”, on Tuesday, November 5, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the seventh in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

This session presented the results of a National study that explored the characteristics of schools in economically disadvantaged areas identified as making a difference to student academic engagement. A case study approach was used to illustrate the challenges and strategies used by school communities to improve the learning environment for their students. The study identified key drivers and models of practice for increasing and sustaining student academic engagement.

The Nationally funded Australian study addresses the concern that National educational outcomes continue to reflect the diversity and complexity of educational challenges for disadvantaged students, with limited long term improvement.

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Dr. Kristopher Wells: an Assistant Professor & Associate Director of the Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services, U of A. Co-Founder and Co-Director of Camp fYrefly (www.CampfYrefly.ca). Book Review Editor for the International Journal of LGBT Youth (Taylor & Francis) and co-author of Supporting Transgender and Transsexual Students in K-12 Schools: A Guide for Educators. Kris’ most recent collaborative project NoHomophobes.com has been featured across the world & recently won Best in Show from the Advertising Club of Edmonton. Dr. Wells presented, An Impossible Pedagogy: What Education Cannot Bear to Know: The Lived Narratives of Transsexual Teachers in K-12 Schools”, on Tuesday, May 7, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the sixth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

This session highlighted the lived experiences of three male-to-female transsexual teachers who transitioned genders, during three different decades (1980s, 1990s, 2000s), within their K-12 public schools. Through the creation of post-structural storylines, lived narratives of personal risk, professional resilience, and political resistance are revealed as these teachers call into question the universality of the categories of what it means to be a “man” or “woman,” and in doing so bring forth new analyses to explore questions of gender relations, power, and inequality within K-12 public schools. Ultimately, this empirical research asks whose lives are deemed to be intelligible and livable and, in doing so, interrogates how dominant understandings of gender, pedagogy, and teacher identity are constructed and actively resisted in an effort to demonstrate that all bodies and identities do matter in our schools (Butler, 2004). This seminar conversation will also ask “So What?” and explore possibilities of how we can begin to translate research into a more just and ethical practice within K-12 schools. Conversation will highlight recent policy directions from Alberta school boards to create safer and more inclusive learning and teaching environments for sexual and gender minority students, staff, and families.

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D. Jean Clandinin: Professor and Director, CRTED

Eliza Pinnegar: Doctoral Student, CRTED

Sheri Wnuk: Consultant, Edmonton Public Schools and Master’s Student, CRTED

Sue McKenzie Robblee: Manager, Community Service Learning and CRTED

These four people presented, “Early Career Teacher Attrition: Problems, Possibilities, Potentials”, on Thursday, February 28, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. This presentation was the fifth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

This session presented the results of a study that explored the intentions of second and third year teachers who were teaching in Alberta; teachers who graduated from Alberta universities but who did not take up contractual teaching positions in K-12 schools in Alberta; and the experiences of early career teachers who chose to leave the profession within the first five years of teaching. The study, funded by Alberta Education, addresses the concern that up to 40% of early career teachers in Alberta leave teaching within their first five years.

2012 Presentations

Dr. Ted Paszek, a former teacher, administrator and central office consultant with the Edmonton Catholic School District, is currently an adjunct professor at the University of Alberta and a trustee with the Elk Island Catholic School Board. He holds undergraduate degrees in Arts, Education and Religious Education, a Master’s Degree in Education and recently completed his PhD in Educational Policy Studies. Dr. Paszek’s work is also informed by his experiences as parent to four children and grandparent to eight. Dr. Paszek presented, “Educating for Democratic Citizenship: A Narrative Inquiry into Teacher Experiences”, on Thursday, November 29, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. Dr. Paszek’s presentation was the fourth in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

Is democracy in decline? Is society’s apparent focus on individualism threatening a sense of the common good? What role does public education and teachers, in particular, have in developing the spirit of democracy? This presentation will focus on a narrative inquiry designed to enter into the conversation of what it means to educate for democratic citizenship. It probes the meanings of democracy and citizenship and the role of education in creating democratic citizens. The narratives of four teachers will be shared to illustrate the ways in which they are working to foster the democratic spirit in their schools. Please join us for our very own “Ted-talk” and a follow-up conversation as we consider and reconsider teacher education for the future.

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Dr. Shauna Bruno is a member of the Samson Cree Nation. She completed her PhD with a specialization in Indigenous Peoples Education. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development. Dr. Bruno presented, “Nehiyawiskwew Âcimowina: Attending to the Silences in the Lives of Cree Women in University”, on Thursday, March 15, 2012 at 12:00 Noon – 1:30 pm in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. Dr. Bruno’s presentation was the third in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

This seminar emerged from a dissertation study about the lived experiences of four Cree women studying in universities, particularly women who are graduates of Aboriginal-focused teacher education programs in Western Canada. This study weaves together an Indigenous Research Methodology and Narrative Inquiry framework. The stories bring insight into the Nehiyawak (Cree) value system and how these values are lived out in personal and professional lives in community and in the classroom. This study attends to silences in the descriptions of university and teaching experiences. Two stories will be highlighted through exploring the memory box concept.

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Dr. Iftody was a research associate at the Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development. Her research interests included: pre-service teacher identity, collaborative knowledge spaces, narrative inquiry, and poststructuralist pedagogy in teacher education. Dr. Iftody presented, “So You Think You Can Teach: Exploring the Search for “Swagga” In and On the Stage of Student Teaching” on Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 12:00 Noon – 1:30 pm in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. Dr. Iftody’s presentation was the second in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

On occasion, popular culture offers us fashionable vocabularies (or ‘buzzwords’) that seem to capture the zeitgeist of a cultural moment in ways that formal theory can’t. Used to describe the ethos of youth culture in the summer of 2011, one such buzzword was “swagga” (or swagger); a term that refers to an individual’s unique style and distinct deportment in presenting him/herself to the world. In this report on research with teacher candidates during and after their inaugural student teaching term, swagga is conceptualized as a socially situated, culturally enabled, and discursively diffuse cluster of experiences, qualities and competencies that must be both ‘owned’ (articulated) and ‘honed’ (tailored)by learning-to-be-teachers. Using the Reality TV show So You Think You Can Dance as a heuristic, I offer you a glimpse into the ongoing identity work of three preservice English teachers - Rae: the negotiating natural; Harrison: the subversive risk-taker; and Cara: the seasoned yet self-conscious vet - as they search for their own swagga in and on the stage of student teaching.

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Dr. Claire Desrochers’ interest in diversity and teacher education draws on personal as well as professional experiences in schools, government and universities as a parent, French Immersion teacher, program developer, field experiences coordinator, university instructor, and educational researcher. She is currently an adjunct professor with the Centre. Dr. Desrochers presented, “A Preservice Teacher Restories Her Understanding of Diversity through A Service Learning Experience” on Thursday, January 19, 2012 at 12:00 Noon – 1:30 pm in Room 633, Education South. This presentation was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Teacher Education and Development (CRTED) as part of the Reconsidering Teacher Education seminar series. Dr. Desrochers’ presentation was the first in the RECONSIDERING TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR SERIES.

This seminar emerged from a research project that explored four preservice teachers’ shifting identities as they engaged with diverse children in a service learning context. Grounded in a narrative concept of stories lived and told as a way to understand identity, the study illustrates how early family, school and social experiences shaped the four participants’ identities which, in turn, shaped their experiences as they engaged with others across contexts over time. One participant’s story will be highlighted as it was told, interrupted and retold through an intentional and ongoing process of relational inquiry prior to, during and following the service learning experience. The expressed shifts in her understanding of diversity speak to the potential of developing borderland spaces of inquiry in teacher education where future teachers can come to know themselves in new ways in relation with children.

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